Landolt-Börnstein - Group V Geophysics
Volume 3A 1986

Oceanography · Subvolume A

Editors: J. Sündermann
ISBN: 978-3-540-15092-3 (Print) 978-3-540-31368-7 (Online)
DOI: 10.1007/b20012

Table of contents (110 documents)

  1. Online Document 1

    1.0 List of abbreviations

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  2. Online Document 2

    Subvolume A · 1.1 Topography

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  3. Online Document 3

    Subvolume A · 1.2 Hypsography

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  4. Online Document 4

    Subvolume A · 1.3 Bathymetry

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  5. Online Document 5

    1.4.1 Classification of the ocean floor features

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  6. Online Document 6

    1.4.2 Major topographic features of the continental margin complex

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  7. Online Document 7

    1.4.2.2 Classification of continental margins

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  8. Online Document 8

    1.4.2.3 The shelf

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  9. Online Document 9

    1.4.2.4 The continental slope and rise

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  10. Online Document 10

    1.4.2.5 Canyons, abyssal cones, and fans

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  11. Online Document 11

    Subvolume A · 1.4.2.6 Trenches

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  12. Online Document 12

    1.4.2.7 Island arcs and trench systems

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  13. Online Document 13

    1.4.3 The ocean-basin floor complex

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  14. Online Document 14

    1.4.3.2 Abyssal hills

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  15. Online Document 15

    1.4.3.3 Submarine plateaus

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  16. Online Document 16

    1.4.3.4 Seamounts

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  17. Online Document 17

    1.4.4 Major topographic features of Mid-Oceanic Ridge complex

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  18. Online Document 18

    1.4.5 Small scale topography of the ocean floor

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  19. Online Document 19

    1.5 Sedimentation of the ocean bottom

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  20. Online Document 20

    1.6 Global geological structure and topography

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  21. Online Document 21

    1.7 Chronology of sea floor topography

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  22. Online Document 22

    1.8 References for 1

    H. G. Gierloff-Emden

  23. Online Document 23

    2.1 The nature of oceanographic measurements

    G. Krause

  24. Online Document 24

    Subvolume A · 2.2 Platforms

    G. Krause

  25. Online Document 25

    2.3 Measuring techniques for oceanic motions

    G. Krause

  26. Online Document 26

    2.3.1 Current sensors and current meters for Eulerian measurements

    G. Krause

  27. Online Document 27

    2.3.1.1.1 Rotating elements and current vanes

    G. Krause

  28. Online Document 28

    2.3.1.1.2 Drag force sensors

    G. Krause

  29. Online Document 29

    2.3.1.1.4 Heat transport sensors

    G. Krause

  30. Online Document 30

    2.3.1.2.1 Electromagnetic induction by the Earth magnetic field

    G. Krause

  31. Online Document 31

    2.3.1.2.2 Electromagnetic current sensors

    G. Krause

  32. Online Document 32

    2.3.1.2.3 Acoustic Doppler effect

    G. Krause

  33. Online Document 33

    2.3.1.2.4 Optical Doppler effect

    G. Krause

  34. Online Document 34

    2.3.1.2.5 Travel time current meters

    G. Krause

  35. Online Document 35

    2.4 Elevation of the sea surface

    G. Krause

  36. Online Document 36

    2.5.1 Temperature

    G. Krause

  37. Online Document 37

    2.5.2 Conductivity

    G. Krause

  38. Online Document 38

    Subvolume A · 2.5.3 Pressure

    G. Krause

  39. Online Document 39

    2.5.4 STD/CTD-instrumentation

    G. Krause

  40. Online Document 40

    2.6.1 Observations at grid points

    G. Krause

  41. Online Document 41

    2.6.2 Lagrangian observations

    G. Krause

  42. Online Document 42

    2.7 References for 2

    G. Krause

  43. Online Document 43

    3.1.0 List of symbols and abbreviations

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  44. Online Document 44

    3.1.1 Thermodynamic variables

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  45. Online Document 45

    Subvolume A · 3.1.2 Salinity

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  46. Online Document 46

    Subvolume A · 3.1.3 Density

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  47. Online Document 47

    3.1.4 Compressibility

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  48. Online Document 48

    3.1.5 Thermal expansion, density maximum

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  49. Online Document 49

    3.1.6 Specific heat

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  50. Online Document 50

    3.1.7 Adiabatic lapse rate, potential temperature

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  51. Online Document 51

    3.1.8 Vapour pressure, boiling point, freezing point

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  52. Online Document 52

    3.1.10 Thermal conductivity

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  53. Online Document 53

    Subvolume A · 3.1.11 Diffusion

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  54. Online Document 54

    Subvolume A · 3.1.12 Viscosity

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  55. Online Document 55

    3.1.14 Osmotic pressure

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  56. Online Document 56

    3.1.15 Brunt-Väisälä frequency

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  57. Online Document 57

    3.1.16 References for 3.1

    G. Siedler, H. Peters

  58. Online Document 58

    3.2.0 List of symbols and abbreviations

    P. Wille

  59. Online Document 59

    3.2.1 Introduction

    P. Wille

  60. Online Document 60

    3.2.2 Models of sound propagation

    P. Wille

  61. Online Document 61

    3.2.3 Applications

    P. Wille

  62. Online Document 62

    3.2.4 Sound transducer characteristics

    P. Wille

  63. Online Document 63

    3.2.5.1 Definition, data base

    P. Wille

  64. Online Document 64

    3.2.5.2 Specifications of the parameters determining sound speed

    P. Wille

  65. Online Document 65

    3.2.5.3 Tables of sound speed

    P. Wille

  66. Online Document 66

    3.2.5.4 Approximation formulae of sound speed

    P. Wille

  67. Online Document 67

    3.2.5.5 Deep-sea sound speed profiles

    P. Wille

  68. Online Document 68

    3.2.5.6 Shallow-water sound speed profiles

    P. Wille

  69. Online Document 69

    3.2.6.2 Deep-ocean transmission loss

    P. Wille

  70. Online Document 70

    3.2.6.2.1 Measuring methods

    P. Wille

  71. Online Document 71

    3.2.6.2.3 Viscous absorption/pure-water absorption

    P. Wille

  72. Online Document 72

    3.2.6.2.4 Absorption by MgSO4

    P. Wille

  73. Online Document 73

    3.2.6.2.5 Absorption by B(OH)3

    P. Wille

  74. Online Document 74

    3.2.6.2.6 Absorption by further relaxation processes

    P. Wille

  75. Online Document 75

    3.2.6.2.7 Propagation loss due to scattering

    P. Wille

  76. Online Document 76

    3.2.6.2.8 Propagation loss due to diffraction

    P. Wille

  77. Online Document 77

    3.2.6.2.10 Complete approximation formula for sound attenuation in sea water

    P. Wille

  78. Online Document 78

    3.2.6.2.11 Simplified approximation formulae for the deep water channel attenuation

    P. Wille

  79. Online Document 79

    3.2.6.3-4 Shallow-water transmission loss, Fluctuation of transmitted sound

    P. Wille

  80. Online Document 80

    3.2.7 Ambient noise

    P. Wille

  81. Online Document 81

    3.2.8.1 Definitions

    P. Wille

  82. Online Document 82

    3.2.8.2 Scattering by the sea volume

    P. Wille

  83. Online Document 83

    3.2.8.3 Scattering by the sea surface

    P. Wille

  84. Online Document 84

    3.2.8.4 Reflection and scattering by the sea bottom

    P. Wille

  85. Online Document 85

    3.2.9 References for 3.2

    P. Wille

  86. Online Document 86

    3.3.1.1 Definitions and nomenclature

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  87. Online Document 87

    3.3.1.2 Quantities related to radiance and irradiance

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  88. Online Document 88

    3.3.1.3 Inherent properties

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  89. Online Document 89

    3.3.1.4 Equations of radiative transfer

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  90. Online Document 90

    3.3.2.1 Optical properties of pure water and pure sea water

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  91. Online Document 91

    3.3.2.2 Optical properties of natural sea waters

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  92. Online Document 92

    3.3.3.1 General principles of classification

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  93. Online Document 93

    3.3.3.2 The original optical classification

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  94. Online Document 94

    3.3.3.3 Classification of sea water in terms of quanta irradiance

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  95. Online Document 95

    3.3.3.4 Classification of sea water in terms of the color of the sea

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  96. Online Document 96

    3.3.3.5 Classification of sea water in terms of the downward irradiance in a narrow or broad wavelength band

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  97. Online Document 97

    3.3.3.6 Classification of sea water in terms of light attenuation and light scattering coefficients

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  98. Online Document 98

    3.3.3.7 Classification of sea water in terms of light absorption properties of suspended and dissolved matter

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  99. Online Document 99

    3.3.4.1 Irradiance on the sea surface

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  100. Online Document 100

    3.3.4.2 Reflection and albedo at the sea surface

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  101. Online Document 101

    3.3.4.3 Irradiance in the sea

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  102. Online Document 102

    3.3.4.4 Radiance in the sea

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  103. Online Document 103

    3.3.5 Visibility in the sea

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  104. Online Document 104

    3.3.6 Passive remote sensing

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  105. Online Document 105

    3.3.7 References for 3.3

    N. K. Hoejerslev

  106. Online Document 106

    3.4.2 Chlorinity, chlorosity, salinity

    G. Weichart

  107. Online Document 107

    3.4.3 Chemical composition of sea water

    G. Weichart

  108. Online Document 108

    3.4.4 Residence times of elements in the oceans

    G. Weichart

  109. Online Document 109

    3.4.5 Solubility of gases in sea water

    G. Weichart

  110. Online Document 110

    3.4.7 References for 3.4

    G. Weichart