Thermal and Rheological Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) Nanoclay

Abstract

Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) is a copolymer of utmost importance in nanocomposite applications. Clay dispersed in an EVA matrix was tested using different types of clays with hydrated silicate layers. Several observations have led to the unexpected physical point of view of (clay/polymer) interaction. Due to the polar nature of the acetate group, a strong interaction would be expected when using a polar group-bearing surfactant such as organophilic modified montmorillonite (OMMT – 30B). Through research using techniques that explore the rheology in the molten state, it was evident that a stronger interaction is possible for nonpolar group-modified organophilic clays. This strong interaction is the result of a complex environment of physical entanglements that show a pseudo-solid behavior among the nanoclay dispersed in the EVA matrix. In this chapter, we will emphasize the influence of processing and type of organic modifier in natural organophobic clay (Cloisite® Na+) dispersed in an EVA matrix. The characterization techniques will be discussed by the study of melt state rheology and thermal behavior of these materials. The relaxation phenomena and creep compliance behavior as well as a correlation between the processing and final properties are detailed for EVA and OMMT nanocomposites.

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Title
Thermal and Rheological Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) Nanoclay
Book Title
Handbook of Polymernanocomposites. Processing, Performance and Application
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-38649-7
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-38649-7_17
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Jitendra K. Pandey Send Email (1)
  • Kummetha Raghunatha Reddy Send Email (2)
  • Amar Kumar Mohanty Send Email (3)
  • Manjusri Misra Send Email (4)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 University of Petroleum and Energy Studies (UPES), Dehradun, India
  • 2 Department of Future Industry-Oriented Basic Science and Materials, Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya, Japan
  • 3 Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
  • 4 Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
  • Authors
  • Vinicius Pistor Send Email (5)
  • Ademir José Zattera Send Email (5)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 5 Laboratory of Polymers (LPOL), Center for Exact Sciences and Technology (CCET), Caxias do Sul University (UCS), Caxias do Sul, RS, Brazil
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