New Developments in Polycaprolactone-Layered Silicate Nano-biocomposites: Fabrication and Properties

Abstract

In the family of synthetic biodegradable polymers, PCL, which is linear, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline polyester, is a biodegradable polymer. Its physical properties and commercial availability make it very attractive not only as a substitute for nonbiodegradable polymers of commodity applications but also as a specific plastic of medicine and agricultural areas. The main limitation of PCL is its low melting temperature (65 °C), which can be overcome by blending it with other polymers. In recent years, polymer/silicate hybrid nanocomposites have been of considerable interest as an effective method to improving polymer properties. This class of materials has improved the material properties due to the high aspect ratio and easy phase-to-phase energy transfer, even at very low filler concentration, if the filler is uniformly and completely dispersed in the host matrix. Polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites (PLSN) show a considerable enhancement of strength, modulus, gas barrier resistance, and heat distortion temperature compared to their pure polymer counterparts, even with silicate loadings as low as 3–5 wt%. Moreover, PLSN are also interesting from the fundamental point of view due to the nanoscale constraints of the filler to the polymer matrix and the ultra-large-specific interfacial area between the silicate and the polymer matrix.

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Title
New Developments in Polycaprolactone-Layered Silicate Nano-biocomposites: Fabrication and Properties
Book Title
Handbook of Polymernanocomposites. Processing, Performance and Application
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-38649-7
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-38649-7_28
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Jitendra K. Pandey Send Email (1)
  • Kummetha Raghunatha Reddy Send Email (2)
  • Amar Kumar Mohanty Send Email (3)
  • Manjusri Misra Send Email (4)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 University of Petroleum and Energy Studies (UPES), Dehradun, India
  • 2 Department of Future Industry-Oriented Basic Science and Materials, Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya, Japan
  • 3 Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
  • 4 Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
  • Authors
  • Hassan Namazi Send Email (5) (6)
  • Mohsen Mosadegh Send Email (7)
  • Mozhgan Hayasi Send Email (8)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 5 Research Laboratory of Dendrimers and Nanopolymers, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, EA, Iran
  • 6 Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology (RCPN), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • 7 Department of Nanochemistry, School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Tehran, Iran
  • 8 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Semnan, Semnan, Semnan, Iran
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