Advances in Lithium-Ion Battery Technology Based on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Electrochemical Energy Storage

Abstract

Increasing demand for higher energy density and higher-power energy-storage devices from the portable power market and the automobile and telecommunication industries have led to the search for novel materials for electrodes or electrolytes that offer higher capacities and energy densities and better performance than the electrochemical energy-storage devices available today. It is recognized that these requirements cannot be met solely by the capabilities of conventional systems and energy materials. Nanomaterials, a cutting-edge technology, can serve as an alternative to traditional materials. Among these, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their hybrid nanostructures have been extensively studied in electrochemical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), supercapacitors, solar cells, and fuel cells as ideal electrode materials. This is because of their unique, one-dimensional (1D) tubular structure and high surface area, aspect ratio, chemical stability, electrical, and thermal conductivities, along with their extremely high mechanical strength. Studies show that CNTs are capable of greatly improving the electrochemical characteristics of energy-storage systems, with enhanced energy conversion and storage capacities. This chapter discusses recent advances in lithium-ion/air batteries based on CNTs and their functionalized derivatives for electrochemical energy storage.

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Title
Advances in Lithium-Ion Battery Technology Based on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Electrochemical Energy Storage
Book Title
Handbook of Polymer Nanocomposites. Processing, Performance and Application
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-45229-1
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-45229-1_33
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Kamal K. Kar Send Email (1)
  • Jitendra K. Pandey Send Email (2)
  • Sravendra Rana Send Email (3)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, India
  • 2 University of Petroleum and Energy Studies (UPES), Dehradun, India
  • 3 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
  • Authors
  • Raghavan Prasanth Send Email (7) (8) (6)
  • Ravi Shankar (5)
  • Nutan Gupta (4)
  • Jou-Hyeon Ahn (6)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 7 Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, 77005-1892, TX, USA
  • 8 School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, 639798, Singapore
  • 6 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju, 660701, Republic of Korea
  • 5 Nanoscience and Engineering Program, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. St. Joseph Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA
  • 4 School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, 639798, Singapore, Singapore
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