Landolt-Börnstein - Group III Condensed Matter

Electronic Transport. Part 1: Quantum Point Contacts and Quantum Wires · 3.7 Interactions

Abstract

This chapter discusses electron interactions. Electron-electron scattering is an important phase-breaking mechanism in semiconductor heterostructures at low temperatures. The influence of changes in a scattering rate, induced here by changes of the experimental conditions, is monitored by the detected collimated beam. The influence of a DC current flowing at right angles to the ballistic, injected current is seen to be similar to the influence of an elevated temperature. The local electron temperature can be derived from experiments of the thermopower in a quantum point contact (QPC) device. This technique has been used in these collimation experiments to show that the reduction of a collimated signal is related to the increase in electron temperature and not directly to the absolute lattice temperature. It is thus concluded that a relevant scattering mechanism for a ballistic electron beam at the injection energies considered is electron-electron scattering, in good agreement with theoretical models for 2DEG systems. The conductance of the QPC device is plotted as a function of an average gate bias for three values of differential bias.

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Title
Electronic Transport. Part 1: Quantum Point Contacts and Quantum Wires · 3.7 Interactions
Book Title
Electronic Transport. Part 1: Quantum Point Contacts and Quantum Wires
In
3 Quantized transport
Book DOI
10.1007/b55682
Chapter DOI
10.1007/10479560_20
Part of
Landolt-Börnstein - Group III Condensed Matter
Volume
34B1
Editors
  • B. Kramer
  • Authors
  • D. Wharam
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