Nanostructure Formation in Hydrogels

Abstract

Hydrogels are divided into nanogels and micellar gels. Nanogels are further divided into physically cross-linked and chemically cross-linked, while micellar gels are divided into micelle-incorporated gels, physically bonded, and covalently bonded gels. Micellar gels can be synthetic or peptide based. Peptide-based gels can be β-sheet forming or surfactant like. The presence of a large fraction of water in the structure of nanogels increases drug-loading capacity, compared with block-copolymer micelles. Micellar gels can increase duration of drug release, reduce gelation time, and improve degradation rate. Due to their high water content, high permeability, resilience, and degradability, nanogels and micellar gels are used extensively as a substitute for soft tissues in medicine, as a vehicle for drug delivery, and as water absorbent in oil recovery and agriculture.

Cite this page

References (55)

About this content

Title
Nanostructure Formation in Hydrogels
Book Title
Handbook of Nanomaterials Properties
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-31107-9
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-31107-9_62
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Bharat Bhushan Send Email (1)
  • Dan Luo Send Email (2)
  • Scott R. Schricker Send Email (3)
  • Wolfgang Sigmund Send Email (4)
  • Stefan Zauscher Send Email (5)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- & Nanotechnology and Biomimetics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  • 2 Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • 3 Division of Restorative, Prosthetic and Primary Care, The Ohio State University, College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  • 4 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
  • 5 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
  • Authors
  • Seyedsina Moeinzadeh (6)
  • Esmaiel Jabbari Send Email (6)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 6 Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, Rm 2C11, University of South Carolina, 301 Main St, Columbia, SC, 29028, USA
  • Cite this content

    Citation copied