Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Polyurethane Nanocomposites

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit a unique combination of electrical, mechanical, and magnetic properties as well as nanometer-scale diameter and high aspect ratio, which make them an ideal reinforcing agent for high-strength polymer composites. However, there is still challenge to achieve the simple and economical method for improving the dispersion and solubilization of CNTs. To improve the dispersion of CNTs, several approaches have been applied by using covalent and noncovalent functionalization methods. Herein, in particular, we focused on CNT functionalization using dendritic polymer and click chemistry approach. The impact of CNT dispersion on the property improvement of composite materials is discussed. In particular, the polyurethane block copolymer-CNT composites are discussed in details.

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Title
Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Polyurethane Nanocomposites
Book Title
Handbook of Polymer Nanocomposites. Processing, Performance and Application
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-45229-1
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-642-45229-1_37
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Kamal K. Kar Send Email (1)
  • Jitendra K. Pandey Send Email (2)
  • Sravendra Rana Send Email (3)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, India
  • 2 University of Petroleum and Energy Studies (UPES), Dehradun, India
  • 3 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
  • Authors
  • Sravendra Rana Send Email (5) (6)
  • Raghavan Prasanth Send Email (7) (8) (9)
  • Lay Poh Tan Send Email (4)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 5 School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
  • 6 Institute of Chemistry, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), 06120, Germany
  • 7 Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA
  • 8 School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
  • 9 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea
  • 4 School of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, 639798, Singapore, Singapore
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