Hydrogen Fuel Cell as Range Extender in Electric Vehicle Powertrains: Fuel Optimization Strategies

Abstract

The transformation of mobility is now beginning through the introduction of hydrogen (H2) as an energy carrier, coupled with fuel cell electric vehicles that can utilize H2 without greenhouse gas emissions. A current disadvantage of these vehicles lies in the limited infrastructure in terms of H2 refill or electric recharge stations, which has hindered their widespread applicability. There is a sense of déjà vu in the current development in automobile design between battery electric and fuel cell vehicle. This race is similar to a competition when the internal combustion engine-driven Ford Model T automobile became the dominant transportation platform in displacing battery and steam-driven automobiles in the United States a century ago and opened up a new industry. In this chapter, we propose a change in the architecture of the power plant of the fuel cell and battery electric vehicles. The objective is that these vehicles can be presently used until the development of an electric and/or hydrogen recharge network allows both being useful with the current status. We present a drivetrain set model, which is a combination of a plugged-in battery and a fuel cell that works as a range-extender system. Different strategies are applied in order to determine the working conditions that will lead to better vehicle performance and higher range. The vehicle performance is referred to the capacity of both energy sources, namely, electricity stored in a lithium-ion battery and hydrogen gas in high-pressure storage tanks. –The possibilities presented in the chapter may open the door to strategic advantages and innovation for car designers in the future.

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Title
Hydrogen Fuel Cell as Range Extender in Electric Vehicle Powertrains: Fuel Optimization Strategies
Book Title
Nanostructured Materials for Next-Generation Energy Storage and Conversion
Book DOI
10.1007/978-3-662-56364-9
Chapter DOI
10.1007/978-3-662-56364-9_12
Part of
Volume
Editors
  • Fan Li Send Email (1)
  • Sajid Bashir Send Email (2)
  • Jingbo Louise Liu Send Email (3)
  • Editor Affiliation
  • 1 Beijing Key Laboratory for Catalysis and Separation, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China
  • 2 Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, USA
  • 3 Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, USA
  • Authors
  • Roberto Álvarez Send Email (4)
  • Sergio Corbera Send Email (4)
  • Author Affiliation
  • 4 Department of Engineering, Universidad Nebrija, Madrid, Spain
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